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A person who is willing to do the job would say yes easily.

Or

A person willing to do the job would say yes easily.

Are both the sentences grammatically sound ? What difference does adding 'who is' make in the meaning of the sentence ?

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1 Answer 1

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[1] A person [who is willing to do the job] would say yes easily.

[2] A person [willing to do the job] would say yes easily.

Yes, they are both fine. In both [1] and [2], the bracketed subordinate clause modifies "person", but the clauses belong to different categories.

Gerund-participial (ing) clauses when functioning as modifiers in noun phrase structure are semantically similar to relative clauses. The difference is grammatical in that they belong to different categories: a relative clause in [1], a non-finite clause in [2].

You may come across the term 'reduced relative clause' used to describe the subordinate clause in [2], but that term is best avoided since there is no possibility of it containing a relative phrase (cf. the ungrammatical *a person who willing to do the job).

Note: It would be more natural to use the word "readily" rather than "easily".

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