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Yesterday I went skiing, even though there is little snow where I live, but I was used to it.

Yesterday I went skiing, even though there is little snow where I live, but I got used to it.

It hasn't been cleared to me when you talked in past tense. I think there's no difference if you talked in past because of in both cases (be used to or get used to), the adaptation process has concluded. Maybe it applies to future tenses.

Could you tell me please what the difference is?

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  • I think you have a question hiding in your letter. I get used to a habit over time. I am used to driving because I practice it so much. (I am now acclimated to it.) Both are in the present tense. Feb 11, 2022 at 20:14
  • 3) Although it's polite, it's ok to leave out introductions and compliments and go straight to the question. ¡Pero estoy encantado de conocerte! Feb 11, 2022 at 20:21
  • Perhaps something went wrong in the migration. But this does not contain the examples that the OP asks about. From the existing answer, I assume it was something to do with skiing... I've edited them back in from the answer.
    – James K
    Feb 12, 2022 at 9:28

3 Answers 3

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Yesterday I went skiing, even though there is little snow where I live, but I was used to it.

That means that I was already accustomed to skiing.

Yesterday I went skiing, even though there is little snow where I live, but I got used to it.

That means that I was not already accustomed to skiing.

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The "get" passive in "I got used to it" is more dynamic. You did something to change your skiing.

The "was" passive in "I was used to it" is more passive. You didn't need to change anything in your skiing. And this means that you were already experienced at skiing in places with little snow.

There is no difference in tense. Both statements use the past tense.

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  • Yes. Get is the inchoative (change-of-state) verb for be, so if be Adj is true, and Adj is changeable, then sometime previous, get Adj referred to the beginning of the state. Feb 12, 2022 at 15:23
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Be used to means 'be familiar with' or 'be accustomed to'.

I was used to it. (I was already accustomed to/familiar with it.)

Get used to is used to talk about the process of becoming familiar with something.

I got used to it. (I was not already familiar with it.)

Both be used to and get used to can be used about the past, present or future.

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