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Dale Texas:

"All there is to know." = The total of all knowledge about something or someone "All there is to say." = The total of all possible comments about something or someone

Can you (meaning any person) ever possess all knowledge or predict all possible comments (which are uttered, said) and stop the conversations even into the future by other people?

Of course not.

You can never know all, about the moon, this, that, or anything you can imagine. You can never say all, about the moon, this, that, or anything you can imagine.

Q.You can never say what?

A. You can never say all there is to say about anything!

You would be delusional to think otherwise.

Does that help? 

Reference


I'd be thankful if you'd let me know the meaning and grammatical construction of "stop the conversations even into the future by other people".

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The grammatical construction of the sentence is actually quite simple! You may get it at once if I explain the meaning of the whole sentence, beyond just that clause.

“stop the conversations even into the future by other people”

Dale is rhetorically asking whether knowing everything that other people would say (in the future) would allow you to stop conversations (in the future) from ever happening, as you would already know everything they had to say. Does that make sense?

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  • I'd also like to know the meaning of "even into the future" and the reason why "into" is being used there instead of the preposition "in". Commented Feb 18, 2022 at 6:36
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    The word “even” is used to emphasize that it’s not just conversations that take place in the next couple of minutes (although those are also technically in the immediate future) but refers to conversations that can take place much farther in the future. “Into the future” is used to indicate a timeframe from the present that continues into the future. “In the future” indicates sometime in the future, without any clear relationship to the present. Commented Feb 19, 2022 at 1:19
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    @Aaaaaaassssss to elaborate on that last point: it’s similar to the difference between “towards” and “at.” Commented Feb 19, 2022 at 1:27

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