1

I last ate raw fish when I was in Japan.

=> I haven't eaten raw fish since I was in Japan.
or
=> I haven't eaten raw fish since I left Japan.

I think the second one is correct, isn't it?

3
  • They have the same meaning, because of the word "since."
    – randomhead
    Feb 18, 2022 at 17:16
  • I would find the first more natural, but neither is 'incorrect'. Feb 18, 2022 at 17:50
  • Raw fish?!! I hope they cook the chips. Feb 19, 2022 at 3:36

3 Answers 3

1

Both are correct, but the former is more natural.

Note: You may also find that sometimes people would say "I haven't eaten raw fish since Japan" implying "since I was in Japan" and assuming the listener knows you have been Japan (and/or that you have eaten raw fish there). For example: I often say things to my wife like "I haven't eaten jerk chicken since Jamaica." She infers "since we were in Jamaica" and I know that she knows I ate jerk chicken there. So it's almost a casual/shorthand way to say it.

0

Both are correct. The first one implies a link between being in Japan and eating raw fish, and the second implies a link between leaving Japan and not eating raw fish. It depends where you want to put the emphasis.

0

Both are correct.

'Since' is a conjunction of time. We can use since to introduce a subordinate clause.

Five years have passed since I last saw her.

They have played better since he joined the team.

I have known her since I lived in Japan.

I have known her since I was in Japan.

I haven't eaten raw fish since I was in Japan.

I haven't eaten raw fish since I left Japan.

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