2

He often comes and plays with us.

You can stay or go with us.

She missed the bus, so ran all the way to school.

The first two examples are fine, but the third one seems weird and ungrammatical.

Is it necessary that the same subject (she) must be added to the second clause?

2 Answers 2

1

The coordinating conjunction so usually indicates a consequence, unlike and meaning addition or accumulation. However, the following sounds much more natural

She missed the bus and ran all the way to school.

and the causal connection between the two is plain.

A comma followed by a conjunction joins complete sentences to form a compound sentence, so if you insist on so as the conjunction, the following may please your editor slightly better.

She missed the bus so ran all the way to school.

Natural-sounding alternatives are

She missed the bus and thus ran all the way to school.

and of course the compound sentence

She missed the bus, so she ran all the way to school.

Retaining so as in

She missed the bus and so ran all the way to school.

still sounds stiff and formal, perhaps more so than with thus, again surprising to this native speaker.

Finally, you might emphasize the penalty of her lack of punctuality, as in

She missed the bus, so she had to (or was forced to) run all the way to school.

1

While the meaning is clear without 'she' being used again, in practice, you'll find that it often is used in both clauses. As a native speaker, I find this is the case in most (if not all) contexts.

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