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Providing both of these phrases mean the same thing, I am willing to use the word “received” in the first sentence as an adjective. Would you please complete the first one?

  1. By carrying out due research and studies on the received scientific reports. . .
  2. By carrying out due research and studies on the scientific reports received from someone. . .
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    What do you mean by "complete"? Complete with the information about who provided the reports? Then you'd better stick with the second variant of your sentence.
    – Vilmar
    Aug 7, 2014 at 13:41
  • @Vilmar It seems like they want to know where they can add the words from someone or semantic equivalent, in order to make the two sentences mean the same thing.
    – user230
    Aug 7, 2014 at 14:02

1 Answer 1

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Received as an adjective takes on a different meaning:

received, adj. Generally accepted as correct or true.

So it would not be appropriate here.

A better sentence might be:

By carrying out due research and studies on the scientific reports which were received from (someone)

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  • That is basically the second sentence with "which were" added, which can be left out.
    – Vilmar
    Aug 7, 2014 at 14:14
  • @Vilmar Hmm yes, you're right.
    – Qubei
    Aug 7, 2014 at 14:16
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    “Received” enjoys plenty of use describing things that have been received in the most basic sense. Aug 7, 2014 at 20:38
  • @Tyler I couldn't find any examples, unless it was with an adverb (well-received, poorly-received, etc)
    – Qubei
    Aug 7, 2014 at 22:50
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    The definition presented here is correct, but it's formal and quite uncommon in modern American English. It's perfectly acceptable to use the past participle form of receive as an adjective. Aug 8, 2014 at 1:25

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