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I found a sentence in “Dubliners”, and was confused about its sentence structure.

we made at once for a sloping bank over the ridge of which we could see the Dodder.

I have seen two translations which translate the sentence to meaning like “ At once getting there, we go for a sloping bank and we could see the Dodder over the ridge. ”

My obscure point is that there are two situation about which, one is for object clause when which behind the “of”, another is attributive clause.

If in object clause, the meaning make no sense to me. So I think it is a attributive clause and the clause must be like: ”which we could see the Dodder of the ridge ”, but the meaning is quite different to the translations.

Ps: Is the river ridge something like river bank or bridge?

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    "Over the ridge of which we could see the Dodder" is a relative clause in where the pronoun "which" has the nominal "sloping bank" as its antecedent. We understand that 'we could see the Dodder over the ridge of the sloping bank'.
    – BillJ
    Feb 22 at 8:32
  • The ridge is the top of the bank. We went at once to a sloping bank. Over the top of this bank, we could see the (River) Dodder. Feb 22 at 9:18
  • "At once" means "immediately," and is a different usage of "once" from "once we got there." Feb 22 at 15:46
  • Note that bank here does not mean "river bank": it means "hill"
    – Colin Fine
    Aug 5 at 20:10

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We made at once for a sloping bank over the ridge of which we could see the Dodder.

"Over the ridge of which we could see the Dodder" is a relative clause where the pronoun "which" has the nominal "sloping bank" as its antecedent. Within the relative clause, "which we could see the Dodder" is complement (object) of the preposition "of".

"The ridge" is the top of the bank.

We understand that 'we could see the Dodder over the ridge of the sloping bank'.

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