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The below sentence makes me confused. is "Reorganized boxes in the attic" and "Rearranged his tools in the shed and moved the Saab's winter tire to a new place" correct complete sentence? I can't find the subject.

Put new screws into the handle of the door from the kitchen to the veranda. Reorganized boxes in the attic. Rearranged his tools in the shed and moved the Saab's winter tires to a new place. And now here he is.

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    No, they are not complete sentences, but a list of the tasks which 'he' has completed. Do you know what the previous paragraph was? Feb 22, 2022 at 9:44
  • the previous paragraph is that He mended the tap in the small bathroom. Put new screws into the handle of the door from the kitchen to the veranda. Reorganized boxes in the attic. Rearranged his tools in the shed and moved the Saab's winter tires to a new palce.
    – Limincao
    Feb 22, 2022 at 11:56
  • That's the previous sentence, but it does contain the subject. He is understood as the subject of the next three sentences. It could have been made into one very long sentence, with the different tasks separated by commas or semicolons. Feb 22, 2022 at 12:00

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These would-be sentences lack a subject. They would all work if they began with the subject - the person or thing that's doing these actions.

In first person speech, sometimes (although it's quite rare), people omit the subject - rather than saying "I [did X]" every time, they just skip it.

The following transcript is grammatically incorrect but in natural speech you occasionally hear people speak like this:

1: "Hey! What have you been up to today?"

2: "Reorganised boxes in the attic. Rearranged tools in the shed. The usual stuff..."

In this case, it works better as the subject in these sentences has already been established (by person 1) as person 2. I don't know if your example included any reference to the subject beforehand.

As a general rule, though, a sentence should always include a subject. (Unless one is implied and understood, as above example)

Edit: Found this article which may be helpful https://webapps.towson.edu/ows/sentelmt.htm

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    Thank you so much for your explanation. I understood now. I am reading a book named < A man called Ove>. in this book I often see some sentences that omit the subject. only have verb and subject. I first see this kind of sentence, so I really feel confused extremely.
    – Limincao
    Feb 22, 2022 at 11:50
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    In normal writing, these partial sentences would have been punctuated as one long sentence separated by commas, or occasionally by semicolons. In literary writing, this type of punctuation is a literary device that violates the normal rules of punctuation to suggest a mental list of tasks or the type of speech Onyx describes in his answer. Feb 22, 2022 at 15:26

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