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Finally, the powder will be put into bags ready for concrete production if needed.

Why is it incorrect to say "to be ready" instead of just "ready"?

Why are these wrong:

Finally, the powder will be put into bags to be ready for concrete production if needed.

Finally, the powder will be put into bags to prepare for concrete production if needed.

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  • Please edit to say: What makes you think the suggestions are wrong? I would say the first sentence is wrong, or at least unclear. Commented Feb 23, 2022 at 15:16
  • @AndyBonner why do you find that unclear?
    – minseong
    Commented Feb 23, 2022 at 15:27
  • I'll give a full answer, though I was waiting to hear why the other two options concern you or why you think they're incorrect. In the first sentence, "ready" could modify "bags," even though the context seems to mean that it modifies "powder." A comma could be inserted after bags, and I can't make up my mind whether it's just a good idea or is absolutely needed. No wait, I can; it is definitely needed. Commented Feb 23, 2022 at 15:32

1 Answer 1

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"To be ready" is an idiomatic way of expressing a state of preparedness for something, especially for an event that may happen only as a possibility or at a time you do not know. We are more likely to say that we are simply "ready" for something certain.

For example:

  • I have packed my bag ready for school in the morning.

Here, the bag is the thing that is 'ready'. But why did the person pack the bag? To be ready.

Consider this second example:

  • I have prepared a go-bag in order to be ready in the event of a disaster.

In this example it is the speaker who wishes to 'be ready' for something, and the bag is just something then enables them to be in that state of readiness. Likewise, in your examples, bags are being prepared and arguably the bags themselves are "ready" but this is part of an effort "to be ready" should production begin.

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