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I will give you guys the situation. I met someone yesterday and had talking about something. The next day I met the same person But i wasn't sure that he was the same person. So I asked him you were the one who i talked to yesterday, weren't you? But it seems like wrong sentence to me. I think it does have some grammar mistakes. What would be the mistake in this sentence and suggest some other good phrases that can be used in this situation

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    Proofreading (asking 'is this right?') is off-topic - but your question seems OK to me, except that you could say "You are the one..., aren't you?". He is still the same person he was yesterday. Mar 10 at 9:09

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Sounds like a case where you could use whom instead of who:

you were the one whom I talked to yesterday, weren't you?

Whom should be used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition. When in doubt, try this simple trick: If you can replace the word with “he”’ or “’she,” use who. If you can replace it with “him” or “her,” use whom.

So as you're not asking who was talking but to whom you were talking "whom" would probably sound better.

Also some minor corrections (off-topic):

and had talking about something

"had talking" is a combination that to my knowledge doesn't exist. It's either "and we talked about something" (simple past), or "and we had talked about something" (past perfect) or "and we have been talking about something" (past progressive) or ".. had been talking.." (past perfect progressive). I'd probably stick with the simple past as it's not related to other events in the past or present (similar to the "met" in the first part of that sentence).

i wasn't sure that he was the same person.

Also "if" or "whether" might be better suited than "that" in that sentence.

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    Or 'we had a talk' - but, as I mentioned above, proofreading is off-topic and questions asking for it don't really merit a formal answer. Mar 10 at 13:00
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    But the whom part isn't off topic, is it?
    – haxor789
    Mar 10 at 13:03
  • I didn't really get the part where you said replacing with 'her' and 'him'. could you give me some examples?
    – dead day
    Mar 11 at 8:13
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    instructionalsolutions.com/blog/who-vs-whom It's more like if you rephrased in to a question what would be the answer. So "Whom did I talked to". "I was talking to him" as opposed to "who did the talking?" "He did". Though granted the quoted trick is actually quite confusing. Sorry about that.
    – haxor789
    Mar 11 at 9:12

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