1

Here is the situation:

The battery level of a device before and after charging is X% and Y% respectively.

  1. How to ask for (Y-X)%, using the words "percentage" and "charge"?
  2. And for Y% (also using the mentioned words)?

Can I ask like this:

  1. What percentage of the battery has been charged in?
  2. What percentage of the battery has the device been charged up to?

1 Answer 1

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There are many good ways to say this. It is common in situations where "the device" can be heavily implied to use:

What percent are you at.

Here "you" implies "your device."

In other situations (conversationally) a common version (and the one I often use) is:

What percent charge is your phone/laptop/etc. at?

or

What percent charge does your phone/laptop/etc. have?

Some other common ways to ask would be:

How much charge do you have? (again implying "your device")

How much charge does it have?

What percent charge is/does it at/have?

And there are others, these are just the ones I head often in conversation. As you can see there are a few that use both "percent" and "charge," but many times one or the other can be implied and therefore both are not used.

To ask about percentage gained you can simply replace "does it have" with "has it gained," and so on for the other examples. Here are some further examples:

How much charge has your phone/laptop/etc. gained?

How much as it charged? (implying "since the last time we checked" or the alike) (probably the most common)

4
  • Ok. But what if I want to know how many percent has been gained? If the charge before and after charging is X% and Y% respectively, and I want to know what (Y-X)% is?
    – Vova
    Commented Mar 10, 2022 at 14:32
  • You can just replaced "does it have" with "has it gained," and so on for the other examples. I updated the answer.
    – Eli Harold
    Commented Mar 10, 2022 at 14:33
  • Can I say "what percentage of charge..." instead of "what percent charge..."?
    – Vova
    Commented Mar 10, 2022 at 15:11
  • @Vova that sounds a bit odd to me but you definitely can. It is correct and you would be understood.
    – Eli Harold
    Commented Mar 10, 2022 at 16:09

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