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It looks like both sentences below are correct as far as the tenses are concerned if checked by MS Word grammar check. But which is "more" correct, so to speak?

I was surprised to find out that he did not come.

I was surprised to have found out that he did not come.

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  • "I was surprised to find out that he did not come." Would be more idiomatic from my experience.
    – Eli Harold
    Commented Mar 11, 2022 at 13:11
  • The more appropriate choice of tense would depend on the context. If you surprise was recent, the first is more likely. If you are referring back to an event some time ago, you might prefer the past. Neither is more correct: simply more appropriate. Commented Mar 11, 2022 at 18:23

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The second sentence implies that the "finding out" (which is in the perfect aspect) occurred before "being surprised". That is grammatically correct, but why would the speaker be surprised on Tuesday by something that he or she had done on Monday? When someone "finds out" something, that person is usually surprised immediately. I'd therefore prefer the first sentence.

Also, his failure to come presumably occurred earlier. Therefore, this would probably be better:

I was surprised to find out that he had not come.

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