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If you still teach Italian at school, which would be better?

A) I have taught Italian for three years.

B) I have been teaching Italian for three years.

If they are both fine, is there any difference?

2 Answers 2

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Yes, they're both fine.

I have been teaching Italian for three years is better and more prevalent because it refers to an ongoing action that is still happening up to the time of speaking and it emphasizes duration from the past until now.

Present Perfect emphasizes more about experiences and changes.

You can say:

I have taught Italian for three years and it's still correct, but not as common as I have been teaching Italian for three years.

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They are both correct, but they're different in meaning. Please look at the similar examples below,

It has rained for two hours.

It started raining two hours ago and now it probably stops raining.

It has been raining for two hours.

It started raining two hours ago and now it is still raining.

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