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I guess the following responses to the original statements are okay in English:

Present Simple:

– I go to Starbucks every day.

– But Jenny doesn't.
– And so does Barry.
– Jack also does.
– John does, too.

– I don't go to Starbucks.

– But Merry does.
– Neither does Paul.
– Mick doesn't (go) either.

Future Simple:

– I will go to Starbucks tomorrow.

– But Jenny won't.
– And so will Barry.
– Jack also will.
– John will, too.

– I won't go to Starbucks tomorrow.

– But Merry will.
– Neither will Paul.
– Mick won't (go) either.

Past Simple:

– I went to Starbucks yesterday.

– But Jenny didn't.
– And so did Barry.
– Jack also did.
– John did, too.

– I didn't go to Starbucks yesterday.

– But Merry did.
– Neither did Paul.
– Mick didn't (go) either.

But those are simple-tense cases, in which each original statement has no more then one helping verb (helping verbs are in bold in the original statements of my examples). However, I am not sure if the same principle should be followed in more complicated tenses, for example, in the Perfect tenses. Should the responses then be following the grammar patterns of the original statements or should they still follow the simple–tense grammar? For example:

Future Perfect:

– I will have done my homework by 3 o'clock.

– But Jenny won't have. (Or should it be simply "But Jenny won't."?)
– And so will have Barry. (Or should it be simply "And so will Barry."?)
– Jack also will have. (Or should it be simply "Jack also will."?)
– John will have (done), too. (Or should it be simply "John will (do), too."?)

– I won't have done my homework by 3 o'clock.

– But Merry will have. (Or should it be simply "But Merry will."?)
– Neither will have Paul. (Or should it be simply "Neither will Paul."?)
– Mick won't have (done) either. (Or should it be simply "Mick won't (do) either."?)

Past Perfect:

– I had done my homework before Randal came.

– But Jenny hadn't. (Or should it be simply "But Jenny didn't."?)
– And so had Barry. (Or should it be simply "And so did Barry."?)
– Jack also had. (Or should it be simply "Jack also did."?)
– John had (done), too. (Or should it be simply "John did, too."?)

– I hadn't done my homework when Randal came.

– But Merry had. (Or should it be simply "But Merry did."?)
– Neither had Paul. (Or should it be simply "Neither did Paul."?)
– Mick hadn't (done) either. (Or should it be simply "Mick didn't (do) either."?)

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  • Very lengthy and redundant question. Unless this is looking for homework answers recommended action is condense it greatly. Jan 7, 2023 at 20:44
  • Then show me how this question could be asked in a simpler way. Didn't get your last sentence about homework.
    – brilliant
    Jan 7, 2023 at 23:35
  • The sentence you missed was "Unless this is looking for homework answers recommended action is condense it greatly." Jan 7, 2023 at 23:37
  • @fertilizerspike - Yes, that's exactly the sentence that I didn't get. I didn't miss it, but I didn't get it, that is, I didn't get its meaning.
    – brilliant
    Jan 8, 2023 at 10:33

1 Answer 1

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They are about the same. Take the example "But Merry had." (by the way, "Merry" means happy, and isn't the name "Mary"):

"But Merry had." = "But Merry had done hers." "But Merry did." = "But Merry did hers."

Both abbreviations make you wonder if Merry had done - or Merry did - your homework, and not hers. To me, this makes it a little less important to worry about matching the tense closely to avoid sounding careless.

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    And so will have Barry is definitely unidiomatic. But Jenny won't or won't have. So will Barry. John will have too. Jack also will have is grammatical, but sounds rather formal. Most people would say Jack will have too in casual conversation. Mar 31, 2022 at 10:35

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