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Is it understood when semi-colons and commas are used to combine long, similar clauses like this? Which one is correct of the following?:

A) The color on the square to the right turned red, the one to the left turned blue, and the others turned green.

B) The color on the square to the right turned red; to the left, blue; and the others, green.

C) The color on the square to the right turned red; the left, blue, and the others, green.

D) The color on the square to the right turned red; the left, blue; the others, green.

E) The color on the square to the right turned red; left, blue; others, green.

Is it the same where it's like ...some thing's, thing;...? (the 's):

  1. Up's opposite is down, left's opposite is right, and huge's tiny.

  2. Up's opposite is down; left's, right; and huge's, tiny.

  3. Up's opposite is down; left's, right; huge's, tiny.

Or, are the punctuations even necessary, and can the two be written like F)/G) and 4)/5)?

F) The color on the square to the right turned red; the left blue; others green.

G) The color on the square to the right turned red, the left blue, and others green.

  1. Up's opposite is down; left's right; huge's tiny.

  2. Up's opposite is down, left's right, huge's tiny.

Also, should single inverted commas be used for the words in the second sentence, like 'Up''s opposite..., and are there more reduced forms of these sentences? Can other punctuations like - (hyphen) and : (colon) be used?

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  • It doesn't sound very fluent to say "the color on the square turned red". We would be more likely to just say "the square turned red".
    – stangdon
    Apr 3 at 13:39

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