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Can we use a comma before "as", if it comes in a second clause?

Cpec will stabilize the economic sector of Pakistan, as it is a flagship project of BRI.

Or

Cpec will stabilize the economic sector of Pakistan as it is a flagship project of BRI.

Which one is correct when it comes to punctuation?

2
  • If you wish the reader to pause after Pakistan, insert the comma. If you think the sentence should be read straight through, omit it. Apr 5 at 14:15
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    I will tell you that my English teachers in high school and college (native speaker in the US) always corrected me for using "as" in this context, insisting that I use "since," since that is the meaning I (and you) was actually looking for.
    – Esther
    Apr 5 at 15:09

1 Answer 1

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Cpec will stabilize the economic sector of Pakistan, as it is a flagship project of BRI.

When a dependent clause follows an independent one, a comma is usually not needed between them.

Owl Purdue explains.

don't put a comma after the main clause when a dependent (subordinate) clause follows it (except for cases of extreme contrast)[emphasis added]

CORRECT: She was still quite upset, although she had won the Oscar. (This comma use is correct, because it is an example of extreme contrast.)[emphasis added].

Your example does not present such a contrast and hence does not need a comma.

since and as are similar in this context, and both could be used to form the subordinate clause. A difference between them is the use of commas.

Cambridge Dictionary explains.

We usually put a comma before since after the main clause [emphasis added]:

I hope they’ve decided to come as I wanted to hear about their India trip.

They’re rather expensive, since they’re quite hard to find.

Your example uses as and hence does not need a comma.

I sometimes use a comma for clarity if the independent clause preceding the dependent one is long. The first clause in your example is not long and hence should not need a comma after it.

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