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The following sentence comes from the English translation of Andrzej Sapkowski's "The Tower Of The Swallow":

The length and breadth of the world, all royal couples had separate bed chambers.

Would this be grammaticaly correct or is it missing an adverb as in:

Across the length and breadth of the world, all royal couples had separate bed chambers.

Or:

Throughout the length and breadth of the world, all royal couples had separate bed chambers.

Any thoughts on this?

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  • The preposition won't improve the poorly expressed idea. I am not sure that criticizing translations is our best skill here. Across the entire world, etc.
    – Lambie
    Apr 6, 2022 at 15:45

1 Answer 1

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Your suggestion is the best way to understand it; yes, a preposition like that is implied. Omitting it is a bit unusual in this case, with such a lengthy phrase, but it's similar to the phrase "the world over", as in "The world over, humans smile to express pleasure."

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