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I am wondering what are the alternatives for "I thought a lot about it" in English using an idiom or fixed expression?

  • I thought a lot about it, but I couldn't find any answer to it.

  • I thought a lot about why my tone of voice changes while I switch across languages, but I couldn't come up with any answer to the question.

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    "why my tone of voice changes while I switch across languages" really like to know the answer of this!
    – user141755
    Commented Apr 10, 2022 at 9:08
  • So this is explicitly not a single-word request? You'll only contemplate idioms or fixed expressions?
    – Joachim
    Commented Apr 10, 2022 at 10:22
  • I don't know if your "question within a question" really is something that (still) puzzles you, but I remember being told that to make my spoken French sound more like a native Francophone, I should make a conscious effort to tighten my stomach muscles when speaking. Which would tend to affect my "tone of voice", obviously. Commented Apr 10, 2022 at 15:13
  • I worried at the problem for ages, but couldn't come up with a satisfactory answer Commented Apr 10, 2022 at 15:15

2 Answers 2

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I gave it a lot of thought is the first one that occurs to me.

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  • Can we say: "I gave it a lot of thought" means the same as "I pondered it" @stangdon?
    – A-friend
    Commented Apr 10, 2022 at 15:22
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    @A-friend To me, ponder is a more formal word, and also means something like "thought about it deeply", while "gave it a lot of thought" could just mean "thought about it for a long time."
    – stangdon
    Commented Apr 10, 2022 at 17:29
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We could consider ponder.

Definition C2 explains.

to think carefully about something, especially for a noticeable length of time

She sat back for a minute to ponder her next move in the game.

We could hence say

I ponder it, but I couldn't find any answer to it.

I ponder why my tone of voice changes while I switch across languages, but I couldn't come up with any answer to the question.

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