1

Is it correct to use two 'of's very close to each other, in the following sentence?

A photo with the advanced stage of execution of the electronic device.

How to avoid this in my case?

5
  • 2
    There's nothing wrong with using of multiple times in a sentence.
    – stangdon
    Apr 14 at 0:30
  • No problem. It's perfectly good idiomatic English. Apr 14 at 1:15
  • 1
    Does this answer your question? How to avoid multiple "of-phrases" in one sentence?
    – ColleenV
    Apr 14 at 14:31
  • There's nothing "wrong" with your example. But if you don't like it, just rephrase to an "appositive noun" usage: A photo with the advanced execution stage of the electronic device. Apr 14 at 15:00
  • It's fine, except that I have no idea what it might mean. What's a stage of execution of the electronic device? And what's an advanced one of those?
    – Colin Fine
    May 16 at 15:37

1 Answer 1

0

"A photo with the advanced stage of execution of the electronic device."
is fine. If you find you get too many 'of's stacking up, you can occasionally re-cast. You've already avoided one potential extra.

For instance, stretching it further…
"A photo of the advanced stage of execution of the display of the device" would be just too clumsy, so
"A photo showing the advanced execution stage of the device's display" would get you nicely out of trouble.

BTW, I much prefer 'showing', or even 'of' [so long as you're not trying to avoid a stack], to 'with'. 'A photo with…' is awkward.

1
  • Thanks. I chose: A photo showing the advanced execution stage of the ....
    – Costas
    May 24 at 0:19

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .