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I can't understand if they are correct or not.

1 Can you name the person whose picture this is?

2 Can you name the person whose is this picture?

3 Can you name the person whose picture is this?

2 Answers 2

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The first one is correct out the three. The second and third are wrong due to the "name the person whose is this picture" and "name the person whose picture is this". Both use "is this" instead of "this is", which does not flow well and is grammatically wrong. This is because "name a person" already states a question, and adding another question in the form of "whose picture is this". Think of the second and third in the form of two questions

Can you name the person? Whose is this picture?

Can you name the person? Whose picture is this?

It represents two questions instead of one uniform question of asking which person had that picture. Plus, when splitting the sentence, the second sentence out of the three (or 1st in the 2 examples above), is already grammatically wrong clearly.

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The OP's first sentence is an example of an INDIRECT question. In the following questions, the part in bold shows where the auxiliary is inverted with the subject

  • Can you name the person whose picture THIS IS?

  • Could you tell us whether THERE'S any truth in the rumours?

  • Would you mind telling me what the TIME IS?

  • Did you know STUDENTS who take a year off before university ARE more likely to do better?

These are usually more polite, less direct and confrontational ways, to ask someone a question.
A DIRECT question would be:

  • Whose picture is this?
  • Is there any truth in the rumours?
  • What's the time?
  • Are students more likely to do better if they take a gap year before university?

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