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I have this sentence, the phrasing of which seems to be (to me) very strange..But I cannot do any better:

The activation of the system is going to be based on the detection of a deviation of a certain value in the X's temperature that has occurred for a specified period of time.

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Switching around "X of the Y" to read "Y's X" can help shorten things while maintaining semantic meaning. You can also usually adjust verb forms or find more succinct alternatives:

"is going to be" = "will be"

If it works for the situation it could simply be "is."

System activation [will be/is] based on detecting the deviation of a certain value in X's temperature that has occurred for a specified period of time.

  • "that has occurred for" -> "over" – Alex J. Aug 12 '14 at 19:15
  • I'd say that "for" indicates that it has sustained the deviation consistently for the entire period of time. "Over" to me indicates that it deviated at some point within that time period, but not necessarily for the entire time. I don't think those are equivalent. – mc01 Aug 12 '14 at 20:59

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