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I am struggling to understand what the bolded sentences in the following paragraph mean:

The origin of Hitler's hatred of Jews is not clear. In Mein Kampf, he described his development into an antisemite as the result of a long, personal struggle. Supposedly, his aversion to everything Jewish came to fruition when he was living and working as a painter in Vienna (1908-1913). Most historians believe that Hitler came up with this explanation in hindsight. He would have used it to assure people who were not yet convinced of his ideas that they would eventually see the light.

What does "came up with this explanation in hindsight" mean? Does it mean Hitler reflected on his past thoughts and experiences about Jewish people to decide he was an antisemite? Moreover, which explanation is the author referring to?

He would have used it to assure people who were not yet convinced of his ideas that they would eventually see the light.

What is "it" in the above sentence? Does "it" refer to the justification for his antisemitic feelings? What does "would have" mean? Does it mean Hitler wanted to but did not yet explain to people his reasoning for the hatred of Jews?

Source: https://www.annefrank.org/en/anne-frank/go-in-depth/why-did-hitler-hate-jews/

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"Came up with this explanation in hindsight" means that he did not really develop his anti-Semitic feelings while he was living in Vienna. He said that he did, but this was not really true.

In "He would have used it to assure people who were not yet convinced," the pronoun it refers back to the closest preceding non-pronoun noun: explanation. He would have used this explanation—the explanation "I developed my anti-Semitic views while living in Vienna"—to assure people who were not yet convinced that they would become convinced.

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  • Thank you for the response. to assure people who were not yet convinced that they would become convinced. Convinced of what? Do you mean they would be convinced of what he was preaching?
    – a_sid
    Commented Apr 19, 2022 at 3:31
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    Convinced 'of his ideas', as it says in the passage - meaning his anti-Semitic ideas. Commented Apr 19, 2022 at 8:05
  • @KateBunting Thank you for the clarification.
    – a_sid
    Commented Apr 19, 2022 at 23:26
  • to assure people who were not yet convinced that they would become convinced. This still does not make sense to me. What would he say to people? Would he say "My experiences in Vienna have convinced me that Jews are our enemies. You all may not feel the same way but about Jews YET but sooner or later, you will."?
    – a_sid
    Commented Apr 19, 2022 at 23:32
  • Yes, that's the general idea. Commented Apr 20, 2022 at 7:37

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