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What is the difference between "in replacement of" and "in place of"?

I was using "in replacement of" in this sentence:

Shah and his team managed to devise a system that allows their robots to map a single 2D topological graph of the environment in replacement of the traditional 3D model that is widely used in previous years.

My prof edited this to "in place of" and I am not sure why. I tried to google it but nothing seems to come up.

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    To put it very briefly: in replacement of just isn't what we say, idiomatically.
    – stangdon
    Apr 27, 2022 at 11:09

2 Answers 2

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Your teacher was right to correct you. Maybe next time trust his/her judgement? And there is a reason nothing came up on Google: "in replacement of" is not correct English, it is a non-existent expression.

The correct English expressions are:

instead of
in place of

"As a replacement for" is a possible combination but there's a difference in meaning. See @PeterJennings's comment.

In your text:

... that allows their robots to map a single 2D topological graph of the environment instead of / in place of the traditional 3D model ...

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Think of "in place of" as "instead of", e.g.

I used jam in place of marmalade -> I used jam instead of marmalade

For "in replacement of", we do not use this as it does not sound right in any context, e.g.

I bought a new fridge in replacement of the broken one

Saying "I bought a new fridge in place of the broken one" can work, but does not make sense when translating to "instead of" -> "I bought a new fridge instead of the broken one", so it's better to use "to replace" or "as a replacement for" here.

I bought a new fridge [to replace/as a replacement for] the broken one

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    As a native BrE speaker, "in replacement of" doesn't sound right to me in any context. I would have said "as a replacement for" instead. So "I bought a new fridge as a replacement for the broken one" or even better just "I bought a new fridge to replace the broken one" Apr 27, 2022 at 9:40
  • @PeterJennings It is grammatically correct though, but thanks for your opinion I will edit my answer
    – DialFrost
    Apr 27, 2022 at 9:43
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    @DailFrost That's fine. I never intended to imply that "in replacement of" was ungrammatical, just that, as we agree, it doesn't sound right and I can't remember having heard or seen that phrase used in practice. Apr 28, 2022 at 10:56

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