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Myridon: "like a block, esp in shape and solidarity" is pretty funny as we're going through the exercise in this thread of showing that "block" isn't a shape.

Source: https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/anvil-a-heavy-iron-block-on-which.3931328/#post-20125217


I'm not sure if "as" means when or because in that context.

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Actually, both can correct. Try substituting "when" in:

"like a block, esp in shape and solidarity" is pretty funny when we're going through the exercise in this thread of showing that "block" isn't a shape

It still holds the meaning of the original sentence, now try "because":

"like a block, esp in shape and solidarity" is pretty funny because we're going through the exercise in this thread of showing that "block" isn't a shape

The meaning still holds true, so both can be used. "because" may be slightly more accurate here, so it might be better to interpret it as "because", mostly because of the fact that the sentence follows this flow:

meaning is funny because we are showing block isn't a shape

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