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The following text is of DI (Dependency Injection) in programming languages which I grabbed from a book called The Complete ASP.NET Core 3 API Tutorial by Les Jackson:

Dependency Injection

Dependency Injection (DI) has struck fear into many a developer getting to grips with it (myself included), but once you grasp the concept, not only is it pretty straightforward, it’s also really powerful and you’ll want to use it. What makes it even easier in this instance is that DI is baked right into the heart of ASP.NET Core, so we can get up and running with it quickly without much fuss at all. Next, I’ll take you through a quick theoretical overview; then we’ll employ DI practically in our project (indeed, we’ll continue to use it throughout the tutorial). Again, as with many of the concepts and technologies in this tutorial, you could fill an entire book on DI, which I’m not going to attempt to do here. If you want a deep dive on this subject beyond what I outline below, the MSDN docs are decent1 .

Why did the author use "getting to grips with it"? Couldn't he use the following alternative instead the highlighted part above?

has struck fear into many a developer must get to grips with it

If not, then could anyone explain it and rewrite the highlighted part above in a different way?

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2 Answers 2

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The sentence:

Dependency Injection (DI) has struck fear into many a developer getting to grips with it ... Green check mark indicating acceptable  form

is grammatically correct and quite natural. The author has used "getting to grips" to indicate that the developers s/he is speaking of are those in the process of mastering this topic.

To "get to grips" or "come to grips" with something is to confront that thing, or to master it, to learn how to handle it. so "getting to grips" is the process of learning to handle it.

The suggested alternate :

... has struck fear into many a developer must get to grips with it Red X indicating unacceptable or disfavored form

does not correct. "developer must" does not work without a relative pronoun. This could be rephrased as

... has struck fear into many a developer who must get to grips with it Green check mark indicating acceptable  form

but this does not emphasize the process as much as the form that the author used. In my view the original is better than this suggested alternate form

One could rewrite the original as:

Dependency Injection (DI) has struck fear into many a developer who is learning to master it ... Green check mark indicating acceptable  form

The difference is just a matter of style, not of good writing nor grammar.

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  • So could you please rewrite it in a different way to me? cause I got some confused about it! May 3, 2022 at 22:46
  • @Hossein Dara I have provided an alternate form in the edited answer. May 3, 2022 at 22:54
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You can understand the sense of it better if you insert to words that are understood:

Dependency Injection (DI) has struck fear into many a developer (who is) getting to grips with it ...

We use this construction in numerous phrases:

...a man (who is) using a hammer...
...a driver (who is) speeding in an urban area...
...a climber (who is) risking his life on a cliff....
...a boy (who is) crossing the road....

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  • And in "has struck fear into many...", does "many" stand for "many developer"? May 3, 2022 at 23:01
  • Yes! Many a.... is an expression that means that same as many. It is used as an alternative when someone is making a point, especially in poetry, drama, speeches:: "Many a man has fallen in love in the month of May. / Many a climber has tried and failed to scale the mountain.** May 3, 2022 at 23:12
  • @Hossein Dara The original uses "has struck fear into many a developer". This has the same meaning as "has struck fear into many developers". The difference is just one of style, using a singular instead of a plural form. May 3, 2022 at 23:15
  • Thank you very much! Just because I didn't know there is no difference in using "a developer" and "developers", I had got a lot confused !! May 3, 2022 at 23:23

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