2

1: Metal will bear beating with a hammer, which a stone will not.

2: He can write a letter in English, which I cannot.

"which" act as relative pronoun and stand for the phrases of "bear beating with a hammer" and "write a letter in English" respectively in the above two sentences.

Am I right?

  • Yes, you are right. – Laure Sep 15 '14 at 14:00
-1

You should use while (sense 4b).

I can't say for sure, but I don't think which is normally used this way. In your example I think you need a conjunction.

  • 1
    Which is perfectly idiomatic here. – StoneyB Aug 16 '14 at 13:45
  • @StoneyB Does "which" stand for the phrases of "bear beating with a hammer" and "write a letter in English"? Thanks in advance! – April Aug 16 '14 at 14:14
  • @April That's how I would read them, yes. – StoneyB Aug 16 '14 at 14:49
  • @StoneyB Thank you very much! You helped me a lot! – April Aug 17 '14 at 14:20

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