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I am not too sure about some particular sentence:

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Choose the ID that matches the office you want to visit. This information is reported by the doctor directly and updated as reported for each plan.

What could be the meaning of "updated as reported"?

  • This might help: The information is reported by the doctor, and it is updated as it is reported (for each plan). – Damkerng T. Aug 17 '14 at 2:26
  • This is actually ambiguous. It could mean that they can only report what the doctor reports to them; essentially putting the blame for any wrong information back on the doctor- they report it as (in the same manner or with the same accuracy) it's reported to them. Or it could mean that the website information immediately reflects updates made by the doctor- they update it as (concurrently with) the doctor updates it to them. – Jim Aug 17 '14 at 4:39
  • Why would you see report as creation? Reporting something is sending a message, which can contain new information (create), information to be modified (update) and maybe even information to be deleted! The doctor reports something to the system, and the system updates the plan according to that report. – oerkelens Aug 17 '14 at 8:52
  • @DamkerngT. For the example, "report" is creation; "update" is modification. Modification cannot come before creation. So, in your answer "it is updated as it is reported", with both "it"s referring to the same piece of information, you seem to suggest that the information is updated (modified) before the said information is even reported (created). – meatie Aug 18 '14 at 2:34
  • @Jim Would "This information...is updated as new information is reported..." be better? – meatie Aug 18 '14 at 3:06
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This information is reported by the doctor directly and updated as reported for each plan.

The second reported here is a participle with passive sense, exactly as in the head clause. Jim points out that as may be taken ambiguously:

It could mean that they can only report what the doctor reports to them; essentially putting the blame for any wrong information back on the doctor- they report it as (in the same manner or with the same accuracy) it's reported to them. Or it could mean that the website information immediately reflects updates made by the doctor- they update it as (concurrently with) the doctor updates it to them.

That is, as may be either a comparative (= reported with the same meaning as the doctor's report) or a temporal locative (= reported at the same time as the doctor's report).

I suggest that it is more likely that the comparative sense is meant, and that the temporal implication is 'perfect':

This information is reported by the doctor directly and [then] updated [with the same meaning] as [the doctor has] reported [it] for each plan.

  • I'm wondering why this kind of ellipsis is legit in this case. I never came across it before. @StoneyB – Kinzle B Oct 29 '14 at 13:51
  • @KinzleB It's not really ellipsis: the sense is inherent in the words and forms. Similarly, if I say "I pass on this news as reported", meaning I just tell you what I heard on TV, without adding anything, you understand "as" to mean "in the form in which it was", and you infer "on TV" and "without adding anything" from the discourse context. – StoneyB on hiatus Oct 29 '14 at 14:19
  • In "As expected, he said little.", is this "as" adv or conj? @StoneyB – Kinzle B Oct 29 '14 at 14:37
  • @KinzleB CGEL treats most of what traditional grammar calls 'subordinating conjunctions' as 'prepositions'; I'm OK with that. – StoneyB on hiatus Oct 29 '14 at 14:44
  • Fine. One last Q: in your "I pass on this news as reported" and "This provision shall survive the termination of the discussions by either Party as provided herein.", are these two "as clause" adverbial clauses or attributive clauses? @StoneyB – Kinzle B Oct 29 '14 at 15:39

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