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Which among these two examples are gramatically correct?

A: "DOES the disadvantageous offer still remain on the table?" B: "WILL the disadvantageous offer still remain on the table?"

The confusion on which should I use correctly has been bothering me over a few years already.

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    No real difference. In one you're asking about a current change in negotiating policy. In the second one you're asking about a potential future change. Both of them are appropriate to negotiations. May 26 at 2:29
  • A sounds like a stilted way of saying “Is the disadvantageous offer still on the table” B implies that there is something that the speaker thinks could affect the status of the offer. And so the speaker is asking for clarification on what will happen if that happens.
    – Jim
    May 26 at 4:07
  • Both would be better without the superfulous "still". You don't need to use still with remain because in this context they have a similar meaning.
    – Sprintstar
    May 26 at 14:06

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