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An American posted a video on social media where he sings something incorrectly and in the description it said literally: "Sometimes, chat messages confuse me for singing."

https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=1151447932361871

People sometimes confuse me for singing.

I interpret this as 'people sometimes think I am singing when I am actually not'. Does it perhaps mean something else or is it even valid English?

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    This doesn't seem to be idiomatic. You need to provide the source and the context. Where did you read this. Who said this? What were they writing about. Please, details please.
    – James K
    May 28, 2022 at 11:41
  • @Michael Munta: It's not another Iron Maiden song is it? May 28, 2022 at 12:05
  • @JamesK An American posted a video on social media where he sings something incorrectly and in the description it said literally: "Sometimes, chat messages confuse me for singing." Jun 2, 2022 at 10:54
  • @MichaelMunta Note you have subtly change the quote from "Sometime, chat messages" to "People sometimes" Now do you know if this makes a difference? Perhaps it does. That is why you should use the exact quote you are uncertain about. Now who is this "American" (there are millions of them) If this is on social media, then there you will have a link, so we can all see the context of the description. You should edit to include that link, please.
    – James K
    Jun 2, 2022 at 11:02
  • However social media posts are generally unedited and so there are all sorts of grammar mistakes or unclear phrasing simply because they are part of a throwaway culture. Nobody expects them to be used as models of ideal English.
    – James K
    Jun 2, 2022 at 11:11

1 Answer 1

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I would only use 'confused me for' to discuss a situation when someone thought I was someone else, e.g. my grandmother confused [or mistook] me for my brother. Mostly, with a normally functioning brain, you can't confuse a person for a thing, especially not if the thing (noun) is 'singing'.

Most dictionaries advise that 'confuse for' is mainly American, and that British English prefers 'confuse with'.

If you mean you became confused or unable to think because someone was singing, or because you did not expect singing from that person, you could say 'He confused me by singing'.

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