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Can I say

"After being operated on his eyes, the nurses took the patient to his room."

I have looked up the meaning of "operate on" and I have found out that "operate + on + someone" who has the operation or + a part of the body. For example, Doctor James has operated on me or on my eyes. If we change the sentence into the passive voice, I will find out that I have been operated on by Dr. James. And my eyes have been operated on by Dr. James. If we mix two sentences together, we will notice the following sentence: I have been operated on on my eyes. Is what I have written true or not?

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  • After the operation on my eyes. After Dr. James operated on my eyes. After my eyes were operated on by Dr. James. After having my eyes operated on by Dr. James.
    – Lambie
    Jun 16, 2022 at 22:57

1 Answer 1

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No, your sentence has two errors.

If his eyes were operated on, you need to say: After his eyes were operated on...

Then to follow that you have to say something about him, not about the nurses:
After his eyes were operated on (by Dr James), he was taken to his room by the nurses.

Otherwise you have what is known as a dangling participle.

A classic example would be: After robbing the store, the policeman arrested a thief.
You have to ask "Who robbed the store?"
To correct the sentence you have to use the passive voice:
After robbing the store, a thief was arrested by a policeman.
The same rule applies in your case.

Finally, while you can say:
After he was operated on (by Dr James), he was taken.....
you can't insert his eyes.
After he was operated on, you have to say what happened to him.

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  • No, you don't have to ask "Who robbed the store?" No sane person would do so, except perversely, either as a joke, or to prove their "superiority" over people who use a real language as opposed to their made-up version with pointless rules.
    – Colin Fine
    Jun 17, 2022 at 23:21

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