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With the COVID-19 pandemic still raging and with little indication of it going away soon, countries all over the world are striving to put in place policies and measures to ensure people’s safety from the COVID-19 virus.

I am just curious why the phrase "COVID-19 pandemic" is not followed by its verb "to be". What I mean is that the phrase "COVID-19 pandemic" should be followed by "is", which is its verb "to be". Is it correct? Is it involved with present participle or anything?

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    Talking of why is X not followed by Y: note that quotation marks must generally be paired in English, as do parentheses. (Otherwise you risk leaving the reader with an uneasy feeling for the rest of the day. Jun 27 at 14:54

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That particular usage of the word "with" is not followed by an independent clause.

A general rule of thumb is that prepositions, such as "with", should be followed by nouns or noun clauses.

So this is correct:

With the rain still falling, we stayed in the house.

But this is not correct:

With the rain was still falling, we stayed in the house.

Using the present participle here makes it so that the phrase "the COVID-19 pandemic still raging" functions as a noun phrase.

This usage of "with" can also be employed with noun phrases that contain no verb at all (even as a participle), as in this correct phrase:

With the end of the discount, sales declined.

The relevant definition in the Merriam Webster entry is 9 a.

EDIT:

I notice that the example you gave contains another useful example.

The phrase "little indication of X" requires X to be a noun phrase too. The phrase "it going away soon" is another noun phrase (through the use of the present participle "going"), and so is the entire phrase "little indication of it going away soon". It would be equally incorrect to say "little indication of it is going away soon".

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    Thank you Chungoli. But if I write "With the COVID-19 pandemic that is still raging and with little indication of it going away soon, countries all over the world are striving to put in place policies", will it be correct? I add that is before still.
    – Yari Nukul
    Jun 27 at 6:17
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    You are my hero. A hero does not always have power. You can be our hero.
    – Yari Nukul
    Jun 27 at 6:18
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    Yes, that is also correct. The word "that" introduces a relative clause, which should contain a verb, which you've rightly included. Note that "the COVID-19 pandemic that is still raging" is itself a noun phrase which is why it can directly follow "with" in this context. And no problem at all :).
    – Chungoli
    Jun 27 at 6:22
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    I cannot thank you enough. you are my precious light.
    – Yari Nukul
    Jun 27 at 7:36
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Be is a copular or linking verb, used to identify and name things.

This function of identifying and naming things is also done with adjectives and various other constructs.

I took the red sock off my foot.

I took the sock that was red off my foot.

(Cf. Russian where to be is simply omitted in the present tense)

Adjectives are capable of expressing other relationships besides identification and naming, so an explicit to be is in fact sometimes needed.

There are five drying towels (do we mean five towels used for drying or five towels that are drying?)

When it is not needed, it's usually preferable to not explicitly use to be.

With the COVID-19 pandemic still raging

It's likely that some would consider "with the COVID-19 pandemic that is still raging" to sound a bit overwordy.

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