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Situation: John has a list of schools he could go to. He also knows required admission points in each school. How can I express that in one sentence?

  1. "John knows how many points are needed to get to which school." ?

  2. "John knows how many points are needed to get to this or that school" ?

  3. "John knows how many points are needed to get to each school" ?

  4. "John knows how many points are needed to get to what school" ?

  5. "John knows how many points in each school's case are needed to get to each respective school" ?

  6. ?

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    "Get into' would be much more natural than "get to", because to makes it sound like he's just traveling to them, as opposed to actually enrolling.
    – stangdon
    Jun 27 at 15:56

1 Answer 1

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The simplest expression is "John knows how many points are needed to get to each school." The others are either more wordy than they need to be, or awkward, or even inappropriate.

Correction: ""John knows how many points are needed to get into each school.""

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  • But wouldn't that phrase mean enrolling in all the schools on the list at once?
    – brilliant
    Jun 27 at 15:57
  • No, it wouldn't mean that. It reflects John's knowledge of the requirements for being accepted by each school for admission, not John's actions, whether actions associated with applying to a school or with enrolling in a school. I see I failed to notice the phrase read "to each school". I automatically read it as "into each school". So the sentence I recommend should read, "John knows how many points are needed to get into each school." Jun 27 at 15:59
  • I see. Thank you!
    – brilliant
    Jun 27 at 15:59

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