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I made two sentences with a word I intended to use as a gerund. But I noticed that it seems like a participle, too. Can the word "having" I wrote below have the both roles?

  1. There are some points to think about having a pet.
  2. We have some points to think about having a pet.

(As a gerund: About having a pet, there are some points to think.)

(As a participle: Having a pet, we have some points to think about.)

Or can I say like this?

  1. There are some points to think about of having a pet.

I would like to put the sentence after this sentence: What does having pet mean? (about responsibilities when you have a pet)

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    These sentences are all awkward, verging on being ungrammatical. Try this instead There are some points to consider when having a pet. Also you need the indefinite article in "What does having a pet mean?"
    – Billy Kerr
    Jun 30, 2022 at 13:35
  • @BillyKerr Thank you so much! I understand.
    – Nigutumok
    Jul 1, 2022 at 0:47

1 Answer 1

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Sentences 1 and 2 would be ungrammatical if "having" were a gerund, because it would be the object of "about". In that case, "points" would be the object of "to think",1 but that would not make sense. (You can't "think points", at least not in the usual sense of that verb.)

Sentence 3 could work, but "of" would not be the usual preposition there. (Some people might prefer "regarding" or "concerning". You could also say "when owning a pet".)

Perhaps it would be best simply to rephrase the sentence. For example:

If you have a pet, then there are some points to think about.

However, if you want to put it after a sentence that already mentions "having a pet", then there is really no need to repeat that information:

What does having [a] pet mean? There are some points to think about.


Note 1: I'm being a bit loose with terminology, but I don't want to get into too much detail.

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