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Basic rules:

For a singular noun ending with no "s," we add an apostrophe and s at the end.<br />
For a plural noun ending with no "s," we add an apostrophe and s at the end.<br />
For a singular noun ending with an "s," we add an apostrophe only.<br />

But some names of companies have already ended with an apostrophe and s; I wonder what the grammatical rule is to form the possessive of such a word.

For example, Macy's is a big brand headquartered in New York City. What's the possessive form of Macy's?

There's a similar question. Possessive of a possessive

But the answers to that question didn't give out a definite rule. I want to know whether there is a rule in the grammar book about how to deal with the situation similar to "Macy's."

I have tried Longman Advanced Learners' Grammer, but I didn't find the relative rule.

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    Macy's is already the possessive form. You can think of it like a short way of saying Macy's store.
    – Billy Kerr
    Commented Jun 30, 2022 at 10:52
  • @BillyKerr Great. Your explanation sounds reasonable.
    – Wu Xiliang
    Commented Jul 1, 2022 at 3:42
  • I've never seen Macy's's or similar. You may never find the definite rule that you're looking for. But note that company names can often have a possessive quality, let's call it, without the 's. For example, you could say either "Microsoft CEO" or "Microsoft's CEO"; either term refers to the same person. I think of "Macy's CEO" as being analogous to "Microsoft CEO."
    – cruthers
    Commented Jul 1, 2022 at 4:02

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