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Which one do you think is correct?

I'm bored of/from waiting for premier league's new season

Or

I'm bored of/from long wait for premier League's new season

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  • 2
    Please post this kind of question on ELL. Bored of waiting. No from.
    – Lambie
    Commented Jul 4, 2022 at 16:07
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    "Bored of waiting", but "I'm bored by the long wait." See Ngrams. Not "of". Not "from". Commented Jul 4, 2022 at 16:13
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    Many British speakers hate it when people say 'bored of' something. Bored with, by or from, maybe. Commented Jul 4, 2022 at 17:47

2 Answers 2

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Your alternatives have different meanings:

I'm bored from waiting for premier league's new season

You boredom originated in waiting for premier league's new season.

I'm bored of waiting for premier league's new season

You have waited but now you are bored: this indicates a transition from not being bored to being bored.

Compare

I am sick from eating mushrooms / I am sick of eating mushrooms.

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  • Can i use "of " to mean i'm waiting and will wait but I'm bored of it. You said "you have waited" does it mean i use "of" when action's over and im bored after that ?? Sorry i didn't understand that part. Commented Jul 8, 2022 at 19:34
  • The comparison is not truly enlightening; the change in preposition yields not just a different aspect of a would be unique state valid for both sentences but two totally different states; in the first case "sick" means one thing (physiological, because of the preposition "from") and in the second it means another (psychological, because of "of"); in fact it is only appropriate to say that "be sick from" and "be sick of" are idioms. Again, in "tired from" and "tired of", where the difference in the two states is now less obvious, the same idiomatic point of view is necessary. (1/2)
    – LPH
    Commented Jul 11, 2022 at 15:41
  • The difference you draw between "bored from" and "bored of", although it reflects a well felt fundamental difference in notion between "from" and "of" seems not to be made by the users; nor does it appear to be relevant : for "from" the boredome originates in waiting and for "of" (transition; probably better to say "tired of" in this case) it would not; I believe that in both cases the boredom originates in waiting, even if it might be felt to varying degrees of intensity while waiting. (2/2)
    – LPH
    Commented Jul 11, 2022 at 15:41
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This construction can be used with no preposition or with one of four possible ones; by order of decreasing frequency of use the prepositions are "no preposition", "of", "with", "from", "by". (ref.)

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This is a construction that is often used with the following verbs:

The meaning is the same. The preposition "from" is also used, only slightly less than "by".

  • by: perhaps 117 hits (ref.)
  • from: perhaps 100 hits (ref.)

It may be added first that, irrespectivly of the general preference for no preposition, AmE prefers "with" and "of" (ref.), while in BrE the inverse is true and "from" must be quite rare (ref;).

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Secondly, it might be also said that, given another verb, the it mignt not be true that the the construction with no preposition is used the most often, and the prepositions "by" and "from" might not be used, although there is no ground for finding them erroneous. This is shown below for the verb "to play".

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