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I would need to be sure that what I wrote is correct:

SOLUTION FOR COMMUNICATION WITH PARALYZED PATIENTS BASED ON VOLUNTARY CHANGES OF THEIR PUPILLARY REFLEX.

Shouldn't it be "The solution"? If not, why? Shouldn't it be "changes IN"? AFAIK, changes of sth is correct.

Does it make sense - voluntary change? What i mean is "a change induced by voluntary activity, such as imagery of something or performing a mental task")

Thank you very much

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'The solution' gives the sense that it is the only solution, rather than one of a number. 'A solution' would be better.

'Changes in' rather than 'of' is correct.

'Voluntary change' is somewhat unclear, as it suggests that one has voluntary direct control over the pupils, which of course we don't. Perhaps 'voluntarily induced changes' would work better. I also think that the use of 'their' doesn't fit with the usual academic style, but I don't know for sure. 'The' might be more appropriate.

So:

A SOLUTION FOR COMMUNICATION WITH PARALYZED PATIENTS BASED ON VOLUNTARILY INDUCED CHANGES IN THE PUPILLARY REFLEX

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  • thank you! Would be not better "in their pupillary reflex"? – John V Aug 20 '14 at 9:16
  • The change in induced by imagery, I guess there is no better word instead of "voluntarily induced"? I would like to imply that the chnage is induced by patient's will. – John V Aug 20 '14 at 9:18
  • Using 'their' sounds too informal for an academic heading, to me. Others may know better. If the patient is actively changing their pupil, then your original 'voluntary changes' is fine. – user8543 Aug 20 '14 at 9:31
  • So I should your example with my "voluntary changes", right – John V Aug 20 '14 at 10:23
  • yes [adding extra text so I can comment...] – user8543 Aug 20 '14 at 14:25

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