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I have finished cleaning the floor and my friend tell me:

  1. Thank you for cleaning the floor

or

  1. Thank you for having cleaned the floor

I would use the second sentence because the cleaning is finished. I cannot find an answer

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3 Answers 3

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Your friend is thanking you for the action of cleaning the floor, so the first sentence is correct.

"Thank you for having cleaned the floor" can be understood, but is literally thanking you for the fact that you have cleaned the floor, not for cleaning the floor itself, which is nonsensical. It sounds more like expressing a feeling of gratitude that the floor was cleaned, rather than expressing appreciation to you for your work

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  • Okay but I did not understand this sentence "is literally thanking you for the fact that you have cleaned the floor, not for cleaning the floor itself" ?
    – Meedfried
    Jul 10, 2022 at 17:57
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Construction logic:

Cleaning the floor is not amusing.

Usage: to thank someone for something or for doing something.

Thank you for cleaning the floor.

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Untensed forms of verbs (infinitives, participles etc) can indeed be moved into the (relative) past by using have with the past participle; for example:

I had hoped to have finished by now.

Having seen the film before, I didn't pay much attention to it.

But it's rather rare to use the "gerund" (verbal noun) in this way, and I think this is for the reason that gotube mentioned. A gerund denotes an action or a state. Cleaning the room denotes an action, that it makes sense to thank somebody for. Having cleaned the room denotes a state: the state you are in when you earlier cleaned the room.

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