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a. Jeff's friends went to Sally's place and talked to her father.

Does that necessarily mean all of Jeff's friends went to Sally's place and talked to her father?


b. I knew that if I gave the flash drive to John at the party, his guests would notice it.

Does that necessarily mean all of his guests would notice it?


c. I knew that if I gave the flash drive to John at the party, the guests would notice it.

Does that necessarily mean all of the guests would notice it?

I think in (b) and (c) we are talking about all of his guests, but in (a) he might have a lot of friends and only two might have gone to Sally's place.

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'All' is not implied in any of these sentences unless it is explicitly specified. In all three of the examples you've given, it could be all, or it could an arbitrary number of friends/guests.

If you want to say all guests, then it has to specified:

All of Jeff's friends went to Sally's place and talked to her father.

I knew that if I gave the flash drive to John at the party, all his guests would notice it.

I knew that if I gave the flash drive to John at the party, all the guests would notice it.

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