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Put your clock forward to the furthest it can go which I think is 2025.

which relative pronoun is used for 'furthest' and acting as a subject for 'is 2025'.

My question is that it's also working as a object for 'I think' at the same time. Or, 'I think' is not a part of relative clause.?

And can it be rewritten as:

a. Put your clock forward to the furthest it can go Which is 2025, I think?

b. Put your clock forward to the furthest it can go which I think that is 2025?

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    Please limit yourself to one question. Asking more than one is off-topic. I've edited out your second question. If you really want to ask it, open a new question
    – gotube
    Commented Jul 12, 2022 at 6:08
  • In a. the relative clause is "which is 2025", In b. the relative clause is "which I think is 2025". Btw,, drop the "that"; it is not needed.
    – BillJ
    Commented Jul 12, 2022 at 8:51
  • @BillJ in original sentence, one of my question is how 'I think' connects with 'which' as which is already a subject for 'is 2025'. 'I think' seems like a different clause as It does not seem to be connected in the relative clause by which.
    – RADS
    Commented Jul 12, 2022 at 9:03
  • There is no object in any of your examples. In the original, the relative clause is "which I think is 2025". Within the relative clause is an embedded content clause, "is 2025", whose subject is "which". Is that clear now?
    – BillJ
    Commented Jul 12, 2022 at 9:53
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    Yes, "which" came before "I think", but there is no syntactic relationship. In your original example, "Which" is called a 'prenucleus'. In a. "I think" is a supplementary adjunct. not part of the clause.
    – BillJ
    Commented Jul 12, 2022 at 12:03

3 Answers 3

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[1] Put your clock forward to the furthest it can go, which I think [ ___ is 2025].

[2] Put your clock forward to the furthest it can go, which is 2025, [I think].

Preliminary point. There is no object in the relative clause in either [1] or [2].

In [1] the relative clause is "which I think is 2025". Within the relative clause is the bracketed content clause, which has a gap '___' in the position of subject, and this gap is linked to "which" in prenuclear position. In other words, the relativised element is not object of "think" in the relative clause, but subject of the content clause embedded within it.

In [2] the relative clause is "which is 2025". The clause "I think" is not part of the main or relative clause but is a supplementary adjunct. The relativised element, "which", is subject of the relative clause.

In both examples, the relative clause is of the supplementary (non-defining) kind, whose antecedent is the expression "the furthest it can go".

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  • And If I say 'Put your clock forward to the furthest it can go which I think to be 2025' then 'which' become the object of the 'think' and 'to be 2025' an objective complement?
    – RADS
    Commented Jul 12, 2022 at 18:19
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    @RADS No: it's not a natural way of saying it, but it has the same analysis as [1] in my answer, i.e. "which" is subject in the embedded clause "to be 2025".
    – BillJ
    Commented Jul 12, 2022 at 19:01
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It can be written both ways. The reason has nothing to do with relative clauses, so let's just treat the relative clause part of the sentence as an independent sentence, which looks like this in the original structure:

a. I think the furthest it can go is 2025.

When using "think" to introduce a particular thought, it can come at the end of the sentence, so our example can be rewritten like this with the same meaning:

b. The furthest it can go is 2025, I think.

You can use either of these versions as a relative clause in your example sentence. Again, there's nothing special here about relative clauses, just the grammar of the verb "think".

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  • If I say, 'Put your clock forward to the furthest it can go, which I think to be 2025.' Here it seems 'I think' with 'which' become relative clause.
    – RADS
    Commented Jul 12, 2022 at 8:44
  • And one of my question was how 'I think' connects with the relative clause In original sentence. As 'which' in og sentence came for 'which is 2025' acting as a subject. So how it(I think) connects with the sentence
    – RADS
    Commented Jul 12, 2022 at 8:53
  • @RADS The relative clause is "which I think is 2025". So, "I think" doesn't "connect with the relative clause" because it is part of the relative clause. Within the relative clause, "I think" introduces "the furthest it can go is 2025" and has no other grammatical role in the rest of the sentence.
    – gotube
    Commented Jul 12, 2022 at 14:50
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The object that's being modified includes more than you stated (and the sentence needs a comma):

Put your clock forward to the furthest it can go, which I think is 2025.

What's being modified is the furthest it can go. The comma indicates that the secondary phrase is not required. It adds clarity, but the sentence is fine with or without it.

Correct versions of your other examples:

(a) Put your clock forward to the furthest it can go, which is 2025, I think.

(b) Put your clock forward to the furthest it can go, which I think is 2025.

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    The convention rules require a comma after 2025 in item (a). Commented Jul 12, 2022 at 6:16
  • Thank you, I added it. Commented Jul 14, 2022 at 3:23

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