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I looked up online to search the word balance. Longman dictionary says

EQUAL AMOUNTS [singular, uncountable] a state in which opposite forces or influences exist in equal or the correct amounts, in a way that is good
OPP imbalance
balance between

Try to keep a balance between work and play.

If balance is uncountable, then why we put "a" article before balance?

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    Longman says 'singular, uncountable' (you copied it in your question). That means that 'balance' can be a singular (countable) noun or an uncountable one. Cambridge dictionary is clearer, using 'or' instead of a comma: balance noun (EQUAL STATE) [ S or U ] Jul 17, 2022 at 14:53
  • For people voting to close because the answer is answerable from a dictionary, perhaps consider it is only answerable from a dictionary if you can understand what the dictionary is saying. It is useful for an English language learner to be able to request clarity on what a dictionary has told them.
    – fred2
    Aug 1, 2022 at 17:30

1 Answer 1

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Longman says 'singular, uncountable' (you copied it in your question). In Longmans that means that 'balance' can be a singular (countable) noun or an uncountable one.

Cambridge dictionary is clearer, using S (for singular) then 'or' then U (for uncountable).

balance noun (EQUAL STATE) [ S or U ]

Balance (noun) Cambridge Dictionary

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