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The future progressive is common to say that some action will be in progress in a particular future moment.

But what if we don't have an appropriate reference to a particular future time?

I've tried to invent a suitable example, but I can't. Does such construction make any sense at all?

  • If you can give a rough example of the kind of phrase you are looking for, it would then be easier to answer accurately. – user3169 Aug 22 '14 at 4:14
  • The future progressive is common to say that some action will be in progress in a particular future moment. - Not always. It may just talk about the future (though future is that particular time!). Do I need to read the question further now? :) – Maulik V Aug 22 '14 at 5:46
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I am not sure if I understand your concern, but if you are asking about what to say when a specific future time is not stated, you could use phrases like in the near future or later on that are not time specific.

I will be going to the beach in the near future.
I will be going to the movies after awhile/later on.

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  • The sentence I will go to the movies later on seems to me a bit strange. I think I'm going to go to the movie or I'm going to the movie is more natural, isn't it? – Dmitrii Bundin Aug 22 '14 at 5:59
  • is the will used as announced speaker's decision? – Dmitrii Bundin Aug 22 '14 at 6:00
  • @Dmitry There's nothing strange about I will go to the movies, but it's simple future, not future perfect/progressive. The will indicates that it's in the future, and conveys that the speaker is confident in or assured of the occurrence. – Esoteric Screen Name Aug 22 '14 at 15:33
  • @EsotericScreenName Right you are. I edited my answer for the correct tense. – user3169 Aug 22 '14 at 16:17

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