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A conjunction "when" and a phrase "at that time" seem to have similar meanings because both indicate time.

Can I use both of them in one sentence like this:

What did you mean when you said "We are more than people," at that time?

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  • Are you Korean, or asking about Korean learners of English?
    – gotube
    Jul 27, 2022 at 2:41
  • @gotube Well, I am not Korean, but, from Asia. Was it like Korean language?
    – Nigutumok
    Jul 27, 2022 at 2:50
  • Yes, Koreans famously overuse "at that time" when speaking English because it's the direct translation of a Korean phrase that they use constantly in Korean. In English, there is no equivalent.
    – gotube
    Jul 27, 2022 at 2:51
  • @gotube Oh, I see! I didn't know that. So, I don't need to use "at that time" every time. Thank you!
    – Nigutumok
    Jul 27, 2022 at 2:54
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    Probably not. See my answer below.
    – gotube
    Jul 27, 2022 at 2:59

2 Answers 2

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Not really, it's best to put like:

At that time, what did you mean when you said "we are more than people"?

Or even simpler put:

What did you mean when you said "we are more than people"?

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The general rule is not to use two or more time expressions to describe the same moment.

In your example, 'at that time' and 'when you said "We are more than people,"' are the exact same thing, so it's redundant and incorrect. It's like saying "at that time, at that time".

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