2

a place we can go to - I'm sure it's correct
a place we can go - I was told here it's possible, though rather informal

(All examples below are mine.)

If it's really possible I'm very curious to conduct research for this topic. I think it's possible probably because we have the word "home" used without "to" with the verbs of motion:
"we can go/get/fly/etc home" -> "home we can go/get/fly/etc __"

I mean:
"we can go/get/fly/etc to a place" -> "a place we can go to __" - the usual variant
but also, by analogy with "home":
"we can go/get/fly/etc to a place" -> "a place we can go __" - one more variant

(1a) The town we are flying to for our honeymoon is one of the oldest in the world. - I'm sure it's correct with "to"
(1b) The town we are flying for our honeymoon is one of the oldest in the world. - ??? (I don't know if it's correct without "to")


By the same analogy, consider the verbs of motion that use "at" :
"we arrived/etc (at) home" -> "home we arrived/etc (at) __"

(2a) The station we arrived at was full of people. - I'm sure it's correct with "at"
(2b) The station we arrived was full of people. - ??? (I don't know if it's correct without "at")

(3a) The station our train has arrived at is full of people. - I'm sure it's correct with "at"
(3b) The station our train has arrived is full of people. - ??? (I don't know if it's correct without "at")


By the same analogy, consider the verbs of "quiescence" that use "at" :
"we are/sit/stay/etc (at) home" -> "home we are/sit/stay/etc (at) __"

(4a) The hotel we are staying at has five stars. - I'm sure it's correct with "at"
(4b) The hotel we are staying has five stars. - ??? (I don't know if it's correct without "at")

(5a) I know the owner of the restaurant you were at yesterday. - I'm sure it's correct with "at"
(5b) I know the owner of the restaurant you were yesterday. - ??? (I don't know if it's correct without "at")

(6a) The hall we are at is the hall of fame of our football club. - I'm sure it's correct with "at"
(6b) The hall we are is the hall of fame of our football club. - ??? (I don't know if it's correct without "at")


So could you check my b-variants and support my reseach?

4
  • Does this answer your question? Omission of “that” (in this text)
    – BillJ
    Jul 27, 2022 at 11:59
  • 1
    @BillJ O_O . No. I cannot understand why you offered it.
    – Loviii
    Jul 27, 2022 at 12:28
  • Your question is about: be at a place versus go to a place. And how those prepositions can be positioned in several places and why.
    – Lambie
    Jul 27, 2022 at 14:16
  • @Loviii I don't know how that happened. Obviously a glitch in the system.
    – BillJ
    Jul 27, 2022 at 15:14

2 Answers 2

4

(1b) is not correct because you are not going to fly the town! You have to say either

The town we are flying to...

or

The town where/to which we are flying...

None of your (b) variants makes sense. You didn't arrive the station or stay the hotel, and you weren't the restaurant! The only reason that I suggested that a place we can go might possibly be acceptable was because of the idiom to go places (though that is usually used metaphorically).

2

This is tricky. "Go" and most other verbs of motion—including "fly", "travel", and "arrive"—normally require a preposition to specify the destination. The following are ungrammatical:

  • *We went the town for lunch.
  • *We traveled my friend's house.
  • *the town we went for lunch
  • *the house we arrived

But there are certain expressions where the preposition is not required.

  1. "place to go (to)"; "go places": the preposition is optional. That's a popular place to go. But: *Let's go a popular place.
  2. "home" does not require "to": We are traveling home.
  3. "here", "there", "somewhere", "someplace", "anywhere", "nowhere", etc. can take the place of a prepositional phrase, especially in colloquial language.
    • Let's travel somewhere warm.
    • Did they go anywhere?

(Some verbs, like "enter", "reach", and "visit", do not take "to": They entered the town, not *They entered to the town.)

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .