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This question asks about pronoun usage after a comma.

The answer in that thread makes sense. However, is a pronoun required in situations where the comma's purpose is not to separate independent clauses? For example, which of these are acceptable?

I obtained two degrees, in history and math, and received the Dean's Award.

I obtained two degrees, in history and math, and I received the Dean's Award.

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  • The difference in your examples is not a pronoun issue, but a question of whether to repeat the subject at the top of the sentence. Either works. Jul 28, 2022 at 20:41
  • Speak it out loud to decide what's grammatical. Writing and punctuation and such don't count.
    – tchrist
    Jul 28, 2022 at 20:41

1 Answer 1

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Unlike the example in the other question, your example uses paired commas to surround a parenthetical1 phrase.

In your first sentence, two predicates are connected with "and", and no comma is required for that reason. Therefore, if we removed the prepositional phrase we'd have:

I obtained two degrees and received the Dean's Award.

In your second sentence, two independent clauses are connected with "and", so a comma is required.2 Therefore, if we removed the prepositional phrase we'd have:

I obtained two degrees, and I received the Dean's Award.

Both are acceptable.


1Or "removable", or whatever else you'd like to call it. Terminology varies.
2I'm using some pretty traditional punctuation standards. There's certainly a diversity of opinions about commas.

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  • Could you please add that in your new versions, a comma could be used, or omitted, in both sentences (the one with the subject repeated and also the other one)? Because commas in those sentences would be a personal, style decision? Jul 29, 2022 at 2:24

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