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Legend has it that this word comes from back in the day when there was an East City and a West City in China, you really had to head to either one for supplies/shopping.

It appears on my grammar book.

This sentence seems a little weird to me. I think of two possible interpretations.

  1. There is an "and" missing.

Legend has it that this word comes from back in the day when there was an East City and a West City in China, and you really had to head to either one for supplies/shopping.

  1. I can read it as having a colon after "from". The word comes from a story, ie "back in the day when..."

Legend has it that this word comes from: back in the day when there was an East City and a West City in China, you really had to head to either one for supplies/shopping.

Which one do you think makes sense?

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    I agree. You can use a comma to separate two clauses but there is usually a word like "and", as you point out, or "but" after the comma. If I wrote that sentence, I would replace the comma with a semicolon instead of using "and" but that is a style issue.
    – John Douma
    Jul 30, 2022 at 10:56
  • @JohnDouma Thanks. What about my second interpretation? Is that possible?
    – ForOU
    Jul 30, 2022 at 11:01
  • The last sentence with a colon after the word "from" doesn't make sense. Even removing the colon makes the sentence look awkward. I would change that to "this word comes from the time when ...".
    – John Douma
    Jul 30, 2022 at 11:38

1 Answer 1

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This looks like a comma splice, two related sentences linked by a comma. [Do you see what I did there?]

A comma splice is a minor error in written English. English teachers marking essays will mark it. Most other people don't even notice it if they are not looking. It can be fixed by inserting a conjunction, or using a semicolon instead of a comma.

Your second interpretation don't fix the comma splice, and it breaks the grammar of the first part. I would not use a colon at that point. It doesn't help.

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