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Let's look at some sentences.

1.John has lived in Paris for three years. (maybe from 2012-2015 and now he is in India)

Can I rewrite this sentence as: John has been in Paris for three years.

2.John has been living in Paris for three years.

Can I rewrite this sentence as: John has been in Paris for three years.

3.John has lived in Paris three times.(maybe from 2002-2003,2004-2006,2017-2020)

Can I rewrite this sentence as:John has been in Paris three times.

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To be somewhere doesn't mean to live there - you can be in a place on holiday/vacation. However, most people would understand John has been in Paris for three years to mean that he has been living there, because of the length of time involved.

However, the use of the continuous tense implies that he is still there. If he left Paris in 2015 you have to say

John lived in Paris for three years and then moved to India.

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  • If John, who moved to Paris in 2019, and still lives there, subsequently went on a trip to somewhere else, it would be true to say that he has lived in Paris for three years, but not that he has been there for that period of time. Aug 9, 2022 at 11:45
  • Very true, Michael. Aug 9, 2022 at 11:53
  • @KateBunting so we are treating the sentence "He has been in Paris for three years" as present perfect continuous tense right? But if we consider the structure sub+has/have+v3 ( here v3 of be is been) , that's present perfect tense. Isn't it? Aug 9, 2022 at 12:24
  • I had to look up what 'V3' means - I call it the past participle. Regardless of what you call the tense, He has been in Paris for [time period] implies that he is still there. He has been to Paris means that he has visited the city in the past. Aug 9, 2022 at 15:10

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