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My customer asked me for a quotation and the conversation between us was as below.

Customer: Can you give the quotation today?

Me: We are still calculating the cost. By the way, will this product be influenced by the anti-dumping taxes in your country? To be honest, if it will be influenced, then the prices we give to you won’t be competitive enough.

Can I use will in an if clause the way I did as above?

Also, are the sentences below acceptable?

If these products will be examined by the customs, I will change the label before they are exported.

If the enemy will attack us by imposing sanctions, buying new weapons will be meaningless.

The quality is fine for now. But if the components will be tested again by the end-user, the current quality of won’t be satisfactory enough.

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You can absolutely use will in the way you described to talk about actions in the future.

In the main part of the question, I would probably choose some different words, but that might reflect a difference between UK and US English.

Customer: Can you give me the quote today?

Me: We're still calculating it. By the way, will this product fall under the antidumping regulations? To be honest, if it does, then our quote will not be very competitive.

You have a choice between using are going to and will, depending on how far in the future the task is. Use will when it's very far in the future and going to when the tasks might be sooner:

If these products are going to be examined by customs, I will change the label before they are exported.

If the enemy attacks us by imposing sanctions, buying new weapons will be meaningless.

The quality is fine for now. But if the components are going to be tested again by the end user, the current quality won’t be satisfactory [won't be good enough].

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  • Thank you for answering. Can I still use will or be going to in the “quotation” and “attack” sentences? I see you change them into simple present tenses. Aug 9, 2022 at 15:18
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    I have to disagree with this answer a bit. In general, we simply don't use the future tense in an if-clause, e.g "If it rains tomorrow, I will stay home", not "If it will rain..." The only exception might be using going to, but please note that X is/are going to is, technically, a present tense, not a future one!
    – stangdon
    Aug 9, 2022 at 15:27
  • @stangdon Will it be better if all of the "will" above are replaced with "be going to"? For example: If our products are going to fall under the anti-dumping regulations, our quote won't be very competitive. Aug 10, 2022 at 1:14
  • @ChienTeLu The most idiomatic way is to use the present tense: If our product falls under the anti-dumping regulations...
    – stangdon
    Aug 10, 2022 at 11:05

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