0

For the activity of being aware is one of those, like chess in this respect, where understanding their point is itself part of their point.

It's seem like the phrase "in this respect" always refers to something that mentioned before, but I am here to ask that if there any possible for the phrase "in this respect" refers to something mentioned after the phrase, which in my example is "where understanding their point is itself part of their point".

And I have two more question about this sentence. It's obvious that the relative pronoun "where" isn't refers to any exact places, I am wondering that if it is a grammatically error. If it isn't, then how should I understand the use of the word "where" in this sentence?

This is the paragraph where the sentence came from(in case anyone need some context):

Thus we can’t just say: whoever is aware must know the basic conditions of failure, in the sense of having already accepted some formulation of them. But we can say that we must be able to recognize these as conditions of failure. For the activity of being aware is one of those, like chess in this respect, where understanding their point is itself part of their point. That is, if I couldn’t recognize that, when all broke down into confusion, awareness had failed, then you couldn’t think of me as aware in the first place. We aren’t aware at all unless we can recognize this difference.

3
  • 1
    Is this paragraph actually written by an English speaker? It's incomprehensible. Aug 13, 2022 at 9:07
  • 1
    @DanielRoseman no, it's written by a social scientist ;-)
    – JavaLatte
    Aug 13, 2022 at 10:10
  • The paragraph came from a book named Philosophical Arguments written by Charles Taylor. 😂 Aug 13, 2022 at 10:45

1 Answer 1

0

I think you are trying to over think this. "In this respect" is referring to the entire sentence which is talking about "the activity ... where [something happens]". The author mentions chess as a comparison/analogy. If you remove the part about chess within the commas, the sentence still makes sense.

One could reword this by simply using "like in chess". The use of "in this respect" could be said to be superfluous here, since it is obvious from the context.

As to the second part of your question, the pronoun "where" doesn't always refer to a literal physical place, it can also be synonymous with "in which", depending on context. If you check any good dictionary, you will see the word has multiple definitions. In the OED, the word "where" has at least 28 definitions!

2
  • Thanks for explaining it. So I can say that if I understand in the way as you do, the chess is just simply an example of "one of those"? Aug 13, 2022 at 10:56
  • @caolizhibai - yes absolutely, it is one of those activities.
    – Billy Kerr
    Aug 13, 2022 at 15:41

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .