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Sir Paul Maccartney's Drangfly lyric has a passage like:

"How did two rights make a wrong?"

source: "https://genius.com/Paul-mccartney-and-wings-little-lamb-dragonfly-lyrics"

wha does that means "to make a wrong"?

also I belive this next example goes in same direction:

"Admitting to Wrongs Makes a Right"

"Wrongs Makes a Right"???

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    Look up the common expression, "two wrongs don't make a right". McCartney is playing on this expression by reversing some words.
    – gotube
    Aug 15, 2022 at 15:08
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    @gotube: How come I get ticked off for answering in comments, but you don't? Aug 15, 2022 at 15:09
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    @gotube This could be the basis of a full answer. Aug 15, 2022 at 15:18
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    @FumbleFingers Ahh!! Too bad there's no "rhetorical question" emoji
    – gotube
    Aug 15, 2022 at 15:30
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    @gotube: I added the "wordplay" tag. We should probably use that tag more often here - especially relevant when that tag alone "explains" much, but the OP doesn't get the reference because it's not in his native tongue. Aug 15, 2022 at 15:38

1 Answer 1

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There is an English expression "Two wrongs don't make a right". It means that you should not retaliate. If someone does something bad to you (ie if someone wrongs you) and you do something bad to them to retaliate, then this is still wrong and bad.

The familiar expression uses the meaning of make used in arithmetic: "Two and two makes four".

McCartney is playing with this expression poetically. He is rhetorically asking "If I did something good to you, and you did something good to me, why is that wrong?" The full lyrical analysis is beyond the scope of this answer.

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    The familiar expression uses the meaning of make used in arithmetic: "Two and two makes four".
    – Colin Fine
    Aug 15, 2022 at 16:44
  • That is a good observation, and I've incorporated it, thanks.
    – James K
    Aug 15, 2022 at 17:04

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