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I'm having a discussion with my partner about the use of correct wording in the sentence. As we are both foreigners and quite stubborn, we can not decide which version is more native and natural.

I’ve just finished packing your parcel and ordered DHL courier for tomorrow.

or

I’ve just finished packing your parcel and ordering DHL courier for tomorrow.

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    As an aside, courier is a countable word, so it needs a determiner, like "a DHL courier".
    – stangdon
    Aug 17, 2022 at 13:47

2 Answers 2

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Both are correct. They have slightly different structures. I've bracketed portions to show the difference in structure.

I’ve just [finished packing your parcel] and [ordered DHL courier for tomorrow].

This means I've just done two things:

  • finish packing your parcel
  • order DHL courier for tomorrow

It could be rephrased: "I've just finished packing your parcel. I've just ordered DHL courier for tomorrow.

I’ve just finished [packing your parcel] and [ordering DHL courier for tomorrow].

This means I've just finished doing two things:

  • pack your parcel
  • order DHL courier for tomorrow

It could be rephrased: "I've just finished packing your parcel. I've just finished ordering DHL courier for tomorrow.

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Both are grammatical, but to my ears,your first sentence (with ordered) is a little unnatural: with that choice (coordinating ordered with finished packing) I would expect to hear I've repeated.

But I've finished packing ... and I've ordered and I've finished packing ... and ordering sound equally natural to me, depending on whether you're thinking of "ordering" as a unitary action that you've either done or not done, or as a continuing action that it makes sense to "finish".

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